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The Easy Part on Sale!

An old price alert told me that Private Politics and Party Lines are both on sale for 99 cents. Private Politics has never been this cheap, and Party Lines has never been on sale before. I have no idea how long this sale price will last. So if you’ve been waiting to grab them, do it now.

Private Politics is a friends to lovers romance featuring a socialite/non profit fundraiser who discovers shenanigans at her job and fears she’s being set up as the patsy. She enlists help investigating from a blogger who’s wildly infatuated with her, and of course they fall for each other. Liam is my most cuddly, vulnerable, REAL hero, and I love how he finds his confidence (and Alyse her ambition). You can get Private Politics at AmazoniBooksKobo, and Google Play. Barnes and Noble isn’t currently matching the price, but I hope it will.

Party Lines is enemies to lovers featuring rival campaign staffers. She’s a Republican who wants to change her party; he’s a Democrat who’s lost all his idealism. I think this is the best romance I’ve ever written, and you can get it at AmazoniBooksKobo, and Google Play. Again, B&N isn’t matching the price, but maybe soon.

While these are the second and third books in the series, you don’t need to read book one (Special Interests) to start here. But please note that I wrote these books in the Obama era, and they feel like it. While I wanted them to have verisimilitude, they’ve become pure fantasy. I wouldn’t write Party Lines today, at least not the way I did. While this isn’t a book about the protagonists moving to the middle or deciding partisanship doesn’t matter, plots do cultural work. And the work this book does might not be the work you need or want right now.

I still love both these books, and it would delight me if more readers found them. But I get that these are tough sells in 2020.

Notes from the Keeper Shelf: The Queen’s Thief Series

This week, I got my hands on one of my most anticipated reads of the year: Return of the Thief, the sixth and final book in Megan Whalen Turner’s young adult fantasy series The Queen’s Thief. And it was totally wonderful.

But in wanting to write about why I thought it was great, I realized that I wanted to talk about the series more broadly, because it’s not nearly well known enough and specifically might scratch itches for Game of Thrones and romance fans.

This will likely be a bit rambling (I’m under the weather), but here’s why you should give The Queen’s Thief a try. I’ll start with a long non-spoilery pitch, then talk about the titles in a more specific, brief, and spoilery way.

Continue reading “Notes from the Keeper Shelf: The Queen’s Thief Series”

It’s No Spoiler

Tomorrow evening, I’ll be moderating a panel on Love’s Sweet Arrow’s YouTube channel to celebrate the release of Olivia Dade’s Spoiler Alert, an absolutely delightful rom-com that riffs on You’ve Got Mail/The Shop Around the Corner and modern fandom. Olivia will be there, and so will the wonderful Mia Sosa, and it’s going to be AWESOME. For more information, check out the LSA page here, and you can register here.

Also, I forgot to mention this in advance, but the country’s other romance bookstore, The Ripped Bodice, teamed up with Besame Cosmetics to do a vintage 60s makeup tutorial for Star Dust. You can watch it here, and it’s super fun and interesting. I’ve actually been wearing eye shadow more as a result, though I’m not nearly this glamorous.

Finally, I’ve been writing. Like a lot. Like I might actually finish a full-length book again. It’s not done, so I don’t want to get ahead of myself, but it feels so good to be writing sort of consistently, to not hate every word I put on the page, and to generally feel like I might want to tell stories again. Just so, so good.

Leaving on a Jet Plane

One of my cat nips is when characters in a book or film debate the meaning of another work of art. Think 500 Days of Summer (2009), in which the narrator tells us that Tom misunderstands the ending of The Graduate (1967), while his love interest, Summer, does not. Or Tiffany Reisz’s The Siren in which Nora and Zach tussle over whether O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” is romantic or terrifying. Or KJ Charles’s A Seditious Affair in which Dominic wrestles with the meaning of several William Blake poems, demonstrating that he’s compatible with Silas and that he’s finally gotten over his first love, Richard.

And any conversation about this kind of intertextuality would likely include When Harry Met Sally (1989). In director Rob Reiner and writer Nora Ephron’s friends to lovers romantic comedy, the titular Harry and Sally constantly jaw about pop culture. From board games to journalists, museums to music, the film’s script bursts with the characters’ opinions about other texts. But the reference that comes up multiple times, and reveals the most about the characters, is Michael Curtiz’s Casablanca (1942).

Seven years ago–how is that possible?–I wrote a brief post about Casablanca, one of the primo romantic dramas of the Hollywood studio era. The love triangle between Rick, the cynical saloon owner; Victor, the idealistic resistance organizer; and Ilsa, the woman torn between them, has been endlessly parsed in our living rooms and our pop culture. But–spoiler alert!–while Ilsa might end up with Victor, when Casablanca pops up in other works, it seems like most people are on Rick’s side.

What does the cultural preference for Rick say about us? While there are some structural reasons why people might find Rick more sympathetic, I think the real issue is that American culture has tended to celebrate the kind of hard, cynical, and even cruel masculinity Rick embodies rather than Victor’s restrained, gentle, and more idealistic mode. So I’d like to suggest, as I did on Twitter yesterday, that Ilsa made the right choice and that Victor would be a better and more supportive partner than Rick.

Continue reading “Leaving on a Jet Plane”

Housekeeping Notes

  • The authors from He’s Come Undone will be day drinking with Molly O’Keefe on her Facebook page on Monday at 4 pm EST. We’re going to donate to the Black Mental Health Alliance for each comment, so come join us and sip on Unravelers, and we’ll give a lot of money to a good cause!
  • After my big podcasts post back in March (OMG, remember March?), I appeared on another episode of Shelf Love talking about myths about romance. Specifically, I make the argument that romances are well written. It’s an all-around great episode, and you should listen.
  • Lastly, I’m now unagented. This reflects nothing about my former agent and everything about how I’m a dumpster fire disguised as a writer. I just need to power-cycle everything about how I work and my career and get myself back on track, and I needed a fresh start to do it.

He’s Come Undone Release Day!

Happy release day to Olivia Dade, Adriana Herrera, Ruby Lang, Cat Sebastian, and, well, me. I’m absolutely thrilled that He’s Come Undone is finally out in the world.

hcu piano bw

Brennan and Kristy’s story might be the most personal thing that I’ve ever written, and it took me almost a year to get it right. I’m enormously grateful to my critique partner Genevieve Turner for reading many, many drafts; to Kristi Yanta who did an amazing developmental edit for me last fall; and to Olivia Dade and Ruby Lang for beta reading the revision. (And it was a MASSIVE revision.)

“Appassionata” is a story about losing your voice and about fear, but it’s also about hope. About how art and love make us vulnerable–and give our lives meaning. And I hope if you pick it up, you’ll love it.

I really can’t tell you how much I enjoyed the other four stories in the anthology. They’re funny and poignant and angsty and sexy and wonderful. I’m so honored to be in the company of these incredible writers.

You can buy He’s Come Undone at almost all the online retailers. We pulled it from B&N after they delayed paying royalties recently. I’m sorry for any inconvenience that causes.

But when you’re reading, I’d highly recommend listening to the Spotify playlist I put together for “Appassionata,” which includes all the music Kristy plays and some contemporary pop that I listened to when I was writing it.

Buckets of Content for Your Quarantine

If you’re self-isolating like seemingly everyone else on earth, and you need some Emma Barry content to watch, read, or listen to, this is the post for you.

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  • I had a fabulous conversation with Andrea Martucci from the Shelf Love podcast about KJ Charles’s novel A Seditious Affair, which is one of my all-time favorite romances. You can–and should–listen to our conversation here. This episode is Not Safe for Work or, if you’re working from home, Not Safe for Delicate Ears. It is also not safe for my parents. (Dad, I mean it: don’t you dare press play!)
  • In the fall, Andrea had the amazing Kate Clayborn on, and they discussed A Midnight Feast. So you should totally listen to that episode too.
  • I just realized I never mentioned the Not Your Mother’s Romance Bookclub podcast did an entire episode on Earth Bound last year, and it was delightful. If you use Apple Podcasts, it’s here, and Google Podcast listeners can find it here.
  • But maybe video is more your thing. When my friend Olivia Dade was in the region over the summer, she and I taped a long conversation about writing romance, and you can watch it here. It’s basically the equivalent of hanging out with us for 90 minutes, and we are super entertaining. We also don’t mention Covid-19 a single time.
  • And if you’d like to hang out with Olivia and the wonderful Ruby Lang, you can do that too.
  • As a reminder, Olivia, Ruby, and I will join Cat Sebastian and Adriana Herrera in the He’s Come Undone anthology in May. I’ve been editing “Appassionata” in the last few days, and I’m so excited for everyone to read it soon.
  • Last but not least, if your TBR needs some more books from me, remember you can get my collection of short political romance Dispatches and my motorcycle club romance Free for free if you sign up for my newsletter. That’s 80K of happy endings, just for you!

That’s so much Emma Barry (and friends!) content–enough to brighten a day or two of quarantine at least. Stay safe and healthy, dear readers!

Rogue Series on Sale!

rogues series on sale graphic

To celebrate the Super Tuesday primary voting tomorrow, the entire Rogue series is on sale for 99 cents for each book. This is an AMAZING deal if you like political romance and want to give a bunch of different authors a spin. I had stories in Rogue Desire, Rogue Affair, and Rogue Hearts (volumes 1, 2, and 4), but you really can’t go wrong with any of them.

Here are Amazon links for the series: Rogue Desire, Rogue Affair, Rogue Acts, Rogue Hearts, Rogue Nights, Rogue Passion, and Rogue Ever After.

ETA: the Rogue Hearts series officially went out of print on May 9, 2020. It was a wonderful ride, and I’m so proud of the project. The three novelettes I wrote are collected in Dispatches if you want them.

He’s Come Undone Cover Reveal!

I have a super exciting announcement: my next project has an absolutely stunning cover and a release date.

Feast your eyes on the spectacular artwork for He’s Come Undone, and, on May 12, 2020, you can savor what’s inside.

The anthology is the brain child of the lovely Olivia Dade. Her pitch to us was that each story should feature a gloriously uptight male protag being undone, basically, by love. I might have sat at my desk and clapped when I was asked to contribute.

My story is one that’s been rolling around my head for years, about a tempestuous concert pianist who’s frozen by stage fright and the piano technician–a literal master of tension and control–who helps her find her passion again. So there’s classical music and second chance with a first crush and a super hot greenroom hook up and fear and redemption and courage. It’s called “Appassionata,” and it’s joined in the anthology by amazing stories by Olivia Dade, Adriana Herrera, Ruby Lang, and Cat Sebastian. Check out this AMAZING video Adriana put together with hooks and aesthetics for all the stories.

If you’re interested in pre-ordering He’s Come Undone, it’s available at Amazon, Kobo, Apple, and B&N (Google Play, etc. coming soon!), and you can also add it to your Goodreads shelves and check out the slightly spoilery Pinterest board for “Appassionata” to tide you over ’til May.

2019 in Review

While it’s true that 2019 was a mildly better writing year for me than 2018 was, I continue to feel “off” creatively.

I’ve been trying to name the source of my writer’s block, per this wonderful post by KJ Charles, and to address the underlying issues that have stripped the joy out of my writing and frozen me.

Around the margins, it’s helped.

  • Genevieve Turner and I finished, revised, and released A Midnight Spark.
  • We finished writing Red Shift, which is currently marinating before we revise and release it hopefully next year.
  • I wrote and began editing a 25K short for a not-yet-announced anthology. Look for news on this in the coming year.
  • I also started and abandoned various projects. But I have two ideas that, at least for the moment, I’m excited about.
  • All together, I wrote about 60K and read 90 new-to-me books.

It’s not where I want to be, but I think I know how to get there, if that makes sense. So here’s to hoping that my 2020 year in review post is triumphant, and that it’s a year fecund with joy and success for you too, dear reader.

(I’ve been writing some version of this post for as long as I’ve been blogging my writing. You can read about my 2018, 2017201620152014, and 2013 respectively.)