The One You Want

Union organizer Millie Frank doesn’t like the spotlight. But when an oh-so-traumatizing hostage situation makes her front-page news, she’s forced to take the lead on an important negotiation…putting her directly in the path of Capitol Hill’s most arrogant playboy.

Parker Beckett will do whatever it takes to close a deal for his senator boss. He’s a pragmatist down to his bones, and he doesn’t have time for naive do-gooders, even if he can’t get Millie’s wounded eyes out of his head.

Parker can’t understand how Millie has kept her idealism in this town. Millie can’t believe what Parker’s willing to sacrifice to pass a budget. As they navigate their political differences, what grows between them looks a lot like a relationship…and maybe even a little like love.

Previously released as Special Interests

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  • How long is The One You Want? 78,000 words, or on the shorter end of single-title length.
  • What’s the heat level? It’s sensual but not erotic.
  • Are there any content notes? On-page sex and alcohol use; profanity; references to anxiety and trauma; a character with Alzheimer’s in assisted living; on-page night terrors; extensive political discussion.
  • What inspired you to write the book? I am a total and complete political junkie and have been since I was a kid. I even spent a few years working in Washington, DC, right after college. The Pinterest board for the book is here and the Spotify playlist for the book is here.
  • What was the writing process like? I started it during the summer of 2012, wrote most of it during National Novel Writing Month that year, and then pitched the book on Twitter in April 2013. The story of how I sold the series is here. It was originally published in 2014. I got the rights back from my publisher in January 2022, and I rereleased it the next month.
  • How different is it from Special Interests? Not much. I updated some of the cultural references, and I lightly reworked a few moments, but it’s otherwise the same book.
  • I don’t like politics. Should I still read the book? I answer this question in depth here. Essentially, I don’t see the book as having an agenda, and I don’t think you have to like politics or agree with Millie and Parker’s policy solutions to like the book. But your mileage may vary.
  • I’d like to review the book. Awesome! I hope you love it, but if you don’t, I support your right to review it honestly however and wherever you want. Reviews are for readers not writers. While bad reviews are unpleasant, I’ll live and I won’t harass you about it. Promise.